Two new riders join the Cantu Gravel Ambassador Crew

We're excited to welcome aboard Thomas Adams and Gabbi Shelton as Cantu Gravel Ambassadors. Our gravel ambassador program is designed to support the working athlete who is enthusiastic and engaged within their cycling community, and have a great sense of adventure on two wheels.  We met Thomas and Gabbi first at Gravel Worlds in 2016 and quickly took note of their raw passion for gravel riding. Their excitement for the sport is contagious on and off the bike. On top of that, they leave everything they have out on the course when it comes to gravel events such as the Dirty Kanza, Land Run, and Gravel Worlds. We can't wait to see what adventures they take on the Cantu Gravel Wheels, the Rebel and the Rova. Representing the Mid-South gravel region out of Stillwater, Oklahoma, home to the Land Run 100, there is no doubt they will put our wheels to the the test in both training and racing. Get to know a little about them below:

2017 Gravel Worlds. photo:  Gravel Guru

Thomas Adams

Hometown:  Stillwater, Oklahoma

Day Job:  Product Manager with J.B. Camera Designs

Bucket List Gravel Events:   I would love to make it over to Reba's Private Idaho. I'm really interested in a Gravel Stage Race/Event, and plus it's Reba and in the mountains of Idaho. It just sounds like a weekend full of adventure, and I think somewhere during day 2 you really get down to what gravel is: finding out what you're made of.   

Upcoming Races:  This weekend! I'll be at the Epic 150 again. After that, I'll be racing the DK hoping to defend my 2nd place spot.. but always looking for more. We'll race Gravel Worlds in August, and maybe a hand full of smaller races that are closer.

Race Results:  
2015/16 Land Run 100 - 3rd SS on a fixed gear bicycle
2016 The Epic 150 - 3rd SS
2017 Maisie's Pride - 1st SS
2017 Dirty Kanza - 2nd SS & completing my comeback to gravel. It had all built up to that event. 

Bike Setup:  I ride a custom, hand built frame made by Scissortail Cycles in Norman, OK. 
TRP drillium SS levers/TRP HY/RD callipers
Frame is not SS specific, and can run gears.. but currently training at 44/17-19T
Thompson stem/ setback seat post. TRP Carbon Cross/Gravel fork
Tires: Bontrager LT2 Team issue- super flat resistant, and have made a thousand miles way easier with little maintenance. 
Wheels: CANTU ROVA baby!!! 

Thomas's Scissortail Cycles hand built frame sporting the hand built Cantu Rova wheelset.

Gravel Worlds 2017. photo:   Gravel Guru

Gravel Worlds 2017. photo:  Gravel Guru

Gabbi Shelton

Hometown:  Stillwater, Oklahoma

Day Job:  Stillwater Summit Co. - local gear shop

Bucket List Gravel Events:  Tour Divide, Grinduro, Rebecca’s Private Idaho stage race, TransIowa... there are so many bucket-list worthy gravel events nowadays.

Upcoming Races:  The Epic, The Dirty Kanza XL, Gravel Worlds

Race Results:  
2016  Land Run - 1st Women SS
2016 Gravel Worlds - 1st Women SS

2017 Barry-Roubaix - 3rd Women SS
2017 The Dirty Kanza 200 - 1st Women SS

2018 Land Run 100 - 2nd Women SS

Bike Setup:  All-City Cosmic Stallion w/ Cantu Rebels set up single speed with a Phil Wood eccentric bottom bracket. 

2018 Land Run 100. photo:   Gravel Guru

2018 Land Run 100. photo:  Gravel Guru

Give these guys a follow!
Gabbi's Instagram
Thomas's Instagram
We're fortunate to have them on board and we're looking forward to their experience our the Cantu Rebel and Rova! #UCantu #CantuAttitude

Adam Blake from Gravel City Adventure & Supply Co. - Emporia, Kansas

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This week we take you Kansas! In the land of the Flint Hills nestles the Gravel City of Emporia, home to the Dirty Kanza. With off-road adventures abound there is no place like Gravel City Adventure and Supply Company to well equip you for your next ride or race, but more than just that, they take pride in creating a community. 

We had the pleasure of interviewing Co-owner of Gravel City Adventure and Supply Co., Adam Blake. After meeting Adam at last year's Dirty Kanza his energy and passion for the cycling community was contagious. We clicked from then on and we're proud to have Gravel City Adventure & Supply Co. as a partner and our 2017 Dealer of the Year.  Without further ado, let's dive in!

Presenting Dealer of the year award.  John Wilmeth (left) and Adam Blake (right)

Presenting Dealer of the year award.  John Wilmeth (left) and Adam Blake (right)

Cantu Cycling Wheels [CW]:  Tell us about how Gravel City Adventure and Supply Co. started?

Adam Blake [AB]:   Gravel City started as a way to support the sponsors of Dirty Kanza. They gave to us and we wanted to give back by stocking and selling their products. That was in a pop up store behind DK promotions. Quickly, with the addition of bikes, we outgrew our space and had to move into the current location. We expanded our offerings and created a true Gravel shop with full service on all makes and models of bikes. 

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CW:  The cycling community is strong in Emporia for many reasons. What does building a community mean to you?

AB:  Community is a primary focus for us. "Building community one adventure at a time," is our motto and we strongly believe in that. Building that community takes many forms and doesn’t just mean selling bikes. It means putting on socials, hosting clinics, expanding the customers usages for their bike, whether bike packing, gravel riding, commuting, or trail riding. Building a strong cycling community of all age and skill levels solidifies Emporia as a destination for people to come enjoy and experience.

CW:  What do you enjoy about helping people find the right bike and equipment for their needs?

AB:  It's all about finding the right value for people.  I love when someone can come in and test ride bikes and dedicate some time to their search for “the right bike”. We believe we carry the right bikes for success in our niche and the right accessories to make your ride more enjoyable. Ultimately, I try and listen more than talk and act as a personal guide for all things gravel and cycling in general. The connection you make when you spend the appropriate amount of time with someone is invaluable. Making friends and bolstering the cycling community is where it's at!

CW:  Tell us about your first gravel experience?

AB:  Well I grew up in small town Iowa, so gravel was all around, but my first real gravel experiences, at least at longer distances, came from the Cup O’ Dirt.  It is a challenge that encourages riders to participate in 100k and 100 mile gravel or off-road rides in search of the elusive (literal) Cup O’ Dirt.

Adam blake (far right) enjoying off-road adventures with friends. photo:  Scott o'mara

CW:  If you could take a 2-week long bikepacking trip anywhere, where would it be and why?

AB:  Man taking two weeks off seems like a dream!  I’d really like to explore Iceland.  The topography and scenery seem like ones that were made up in a fairy tale.

CW:  What big events are you looking forward to this year?

AB:  First and foremost I’m looking forward to Dirty Kanza- "The World's Premier Gravel Grinder".  The DK really brings our community together.  People from far away and locally here in Emporia all banding together to cheer on riders and embrace gravel… there’s nothing like it.  Beyond that I’m not personally participating in anything big, but I love to follow the dots on the Tour Divide.  We have a few customers tackling that beast this year and it will be great to support them from afar. Bobby Thompson, one of our shop mechanics, is an avid gravel rider and will be riding in gravel events throughout the year.

Dirty Kanza week

Dirty Kanza week

CW:  Favorite part of Dirty Kanza week?

AB:  Just being in the shop, wrenching and selling.  So much excitement and so much energy flows through our shop that weekend. They are long days, but the interactions we have with people (and coffee) keep us going.  Making friends, telling tall tales, and watching the finish line as personal goals are accomplished…awesome.

CW:  Where is your happy place?

AB:  HA, I just answered this question to myself a few weeks ago out loud.  It's DEFINITELY around a fire, with friends and my fiancé, maybe a root beer, eating dehydrated food from a bag.  Can’t beat it.

photo:  Scott o'mara

CW:  What has been your biggest bike adventure to date?

AB:  On the bike, my best and biggest adventures have been centered around 3 day tours.  Up to Chequamegon [Wisconsin] or here locally.  With driving they take up about 5 days and usually that's about all I can manage to get out of the shop for.  They’re not too daunting and nothing major, but fun and refreshing.

Chequamegon Fat Tire Festival - Cable, Wisconsin  photo:  Scott o'mara

CW:  What advice do you have for a someone who is interested in looking to start riding gravel or bikepacking?

AB:  Visit your local bike shop.  Try bikes out- you should be allowed to test ride (and for a little while).  Try to focus on features that stick out to you and seem to resonate.  Bikes are very feature packed, but if it isn’t something you’d use then it loses its value.  As far as bags go: look for rental bags, we rent handlebar rolls and seatbags as well as some other camping equipment.  Find a friend and go on an overnighter, somewhere close… try it out!

Salsa Warbird featuring the Cantu Rebel as part of the GC Signature Series.


For more information checkout the Gravel City Adventure & Supply Co. website. Be sure to follow Gravel City Adventure & Supply company on Facebook and Instagram

The 2017 Dirty Kanza 200

This past June, I completed my first Dirty Kanza 200, riding a custom set of Cantu Wheels built by my husband John and my trusty steel frame bike "Bumblebee" built by our friend, Hans Schneider. Here is my story...

riding through the jagged, sharp gravel of the flint hills. Photo:  matt Fowler/Gravel guru

**Article by Venny Wilmeth, first published in the Texas Racing Post. Video and Newspaper Article to follow.

The wonder and reward of the Dirty Kanza belongs to anyone who goes looking for it. Somewhere between a bustling start and the finish of a 200 mile race, limits are either made or broken. The Dirty Kanza is just as much a personal conquest as it is the Super Bowl of gravel events.

I first caught the gravel bug at Gravel Worlds in August of 2016 in Lincoln, Nebraska. 150 miles and 10,000 feet of climbing. There was a buzz in the air about the Dirty Kanza. 200 miles? I’m good. Who is crazy enough to ride 200 miles? I can’t ride 200 miles.

I laugh because five months later I proved myself wrong and signed up in January. There came the nerves clicking the ‘Register’ button. Luckily no hesitation because it sold out in less than an hour. One click and my journey to Kanza had begun. My husband was not so lucky. His category sold out within 13 minutes! He would settle for next year and be my one man support crew for this year’s journey.

The Dirty Kanza (DK200) celebrated its 12th anniversary and has grown to more than 2,000 participants. The town of Emporia, Kansas becomes a holy grail for any gravel rider. This is what happens when a the community is engaged and involved. The entire experience is not possible without them and it’s one of the reasons, if not the main one, why people come back for more.

The Dirty Kanza 200 is 206 mile course with roughly 9,000 feet of climbing. You are self-supported and self-navigated riding through remote and rugged regions given any weather conditions. No support is allowed along the course. There are three check-points where you can refuel and replenish with your support crew.

12 weeks of training, lots of mental preparation, hundreds of solo miles ridden (what I call character building miles), many miles with friends, and dozens of articles and videos later. The big day had finally arrived.

My first goal was to finish. I thought 16 hours was good, well safe, goal time averaging roughly around 13 mph. A bigger goal was to complete the Race the Sun challenge and finish before the sunset at 8:42 pm.

The start to an amazing day

I can’t think about the start without getting the chills. With a 6 a.m. start, riders start filling Commercial Street beginning at 5 a.m. in the morning. The broadway lights of the Historic Granada Theater serve as a beacon to the start line. We take a moment to celebrate the weather, because shockingly enough rain and thunderstorms had crawled along the forecast up until the day previous. What a break! Dawn is breaking, smiles, and sighs. “5 minutes to the start!” My stomach drops. I feel a sense of accomplishment just getting to this place. The countdown begins 5…4...3…2…1 “Let’s roll!”

This was the first of many cloud nine moments throughout the day. Around 2,200 riders rolled down Commercial Street escorted by police for the neutral start. Friends, family, and locals lined the streets cheering us on as we headed out of town to the gravel roads. The pros were up front leading the pack. I was about 40 seconds back playing it safe, knowing I would have to save my matches for later. The first section of gravel roads were hard packed. Everyone quickly organized themselves into one of the two pace lines that the road allowed room for. Trying to get around riders was tricky with looser gravel surrounding us. I trusted my skills and moved safely up when I had the opportunity.

winding gravel through the flint hills. photo:  Matt fowler/gravel guru

After mile ten I was opened up to a new country, the Flint Hills of Kansas. Open range, rugged, and rolling hills as far as the horizon. At the top of the climbs you could see the most stunning views of the sunrise, hazy blues mixed in with the peachy glows. Pinch me. I couldn’t be mesmerized too long. The Flints Hills is also infamous for flats. Given that the Native Americans used flint rock for arrowheads, one cannot be too zealous bombing down the fast, gnarly descents. I remember our friend saying, “Respect the descents and watch your line.” There were some drop offs where you couldn’t see the steepness of the slope until right before you came upon it. Large sharp edged chunks of rock awaited for you at the top, the bottom, and sometimes in between. At the bottom, several riders would be pulled over fixing flats. Respectfully, I descended.

Around mile 30 we were coming out of the Flint Hills and ranching region to more familiar fast gravel roads. I felt good and eventually joined onto a pace line. We averaged about a 20 mph hot pace into the first checkpoint in Madsion - mile 48. A welcoming crowd awaited us at Madision High School. My husband, John, quickly escorted me to the van to refuel. My face was all covered in dry Kansas dust. I splashed water on myself, drank a can of coconut juice, and restocked rice cakes and gels while John checked my bike and re-lubed my chain. After a quick bite, I was off.

staying hydrated and riding with a good group through the first leg. photo:  matt fowler/Gravel guru

refueling at checkpoint 1 in madison

56 miles to the next check point in Eureka. Three miles after leaving Madision, I feel like I’m missing something. I reach a hand behind and slap my back. Nothing there. “I forgot my CamelBak!” I decided not to turn around and make the best out my two water bottles I had. I start riding with a small group of 4 and the guy up front starts talking about Texaco Hill. He points off to the distance. “See that tiny tower, we’ve got a hard four mile climb ahead of us.” If it was one thing I felt good about, it was climbing. I had trained for this and felt prepared with a 46/36 chainring paired with an 11-28 cassette. I climbed a higher cadence than most and mixed in some out of saddle riding while staying in good rhythm. I survived Texaco Hill with energy to spare. Another tough climb was Teter Hill. It was long and steep, some people had to get off and walk their bike up. Ten miles from the Eureka awaited one last kicker. This one was a rough and steep, two-punch climb. I climbed around the bend and my head tilted up to see the top of another arduous climb. People were hiking their bikes left and right. I could here grunts of determination behind me. The last five feet to the crest, I begin inching my way forward using every part of my body to keep the pedals turning over. A group was cheering us on at the top. Once over the climb I quickly recovered and started tackling down the rollers that lay before me. They were nothing compared to the previous climbs. I soon found myself working in a fast pace line with 6 other friendly faces. We encouraged each other and communicated as we rolled into Eureka. Coming into checkpoint 2 (mile 104) we parted our ways to our support crew. I hoped to see them again.

Leaving the checkpoint, I didn’t forget my CamelBak this time. John helped me replenish with Pedialyte and it worked well. I was never extremely thirsty or hungry. After 104 miles, I was in good shape. Going into the third leg (miles 104-162) I was optimistic at first, but it became a slow drag and my mental energy went south. The third leg has been describe as some of the following descriptions: the dark place, where you’re mentally trying to climb out of the hole, dying a million deaths, and fighting demons. Fortunately, I had that little voice in my head. “Forward progress.” After all it was demoralizing to look down and see my speed under 10 mph. I thought about all my friends and family that were cheering for me back at home. I thought about how my husband was not going to let me quit. We were in this together. Quit wasn’t in our vocabulary for this journey, but it grazed my mind. My hopes to beat the sun were diminishing. “I just want to finish.” There were not many trains or pacelines created. Everyone seemed to be in their own solitary confinement, fighting cramps, overcoming mechanicals, or fixing their fourth flat. It was a long 58 miles.

trying to recover at the last checkpoint in Madison.

I came out of that hole once the town of Madison was in sight. The last and final checkpoint! Recovering from a demoralizing 3rd leg of the course, John looked at me, “You can do this, you can still beat the sun.” I had just under 3.5 hours to cover the last 45 miles, seems reasonable, but after 162 miles anything can happen. I was physically and mentally beat. Then suddenly a spark. Two guys pass me and we start pushing each other. We start working together to stay on pace, a small pain train was then created of 6 riders with one goal in mind, Race the Sun. The uplifting camaraderie of the gravel culture was in full force. It was suspenseful and hurtful, to watch the sun creep closer to the horizon while putting everything I had into each pedal stroke. Our pain train dwindled down to two riders, me and Steve. This was Steve’s fifth Dirty Kanza 200 on a fat bike. This would be his first time to beat the sun. Eight miles out and we’re making good time. Don't flat. Don't flat. Don't flat. Four miles out, the sun is just above the horizon. I was overcome with emotions seeing the town of Emporia.

steve cannon full speed ahead!

“We're going to do this!” I thought. I got goosebumps passing under the iconic I-35 tunnel coming onto the Emporia State University campus. That's when I could hear the loud speakers and crowd from downtown. I forgot about the pain, I was on cloud nine once again. One more hill then we winded through campus. The main street of Emporia was electric in the air. We approached the finishing chute down Commercial Street, lined with family, friends, and the fans roaring with pride, cowbells and high fives left and right. That feeling I will never forget. We beat the sun. I gave my husband a big dirty hug after crossing the finish line. I had finished my first Dirty Kanza 200. And yes, I plan on coming back next year for another unforgettable experience.

DONE!

covered in kansas dirt from head to toe. not ashamed.

It took about a day or so for it to sink  what I had accomplished. 

It took about a day or so for it to sink  what I had accomplished. 

Bumblebee post dk